Male hair styles and head gear in the 1400’s

Early in the 1400’s, the (liripipe) hood remained a common component of dress for all classes, although it was frequently worn around the neck as a cowl or twisted into the fantastical shapes of the chaperon. Hats of various styles—tall-crowned with small brims or no brims at all, hats with brims turned up on one side for variations of the coif, or low-crowned with wider brims pulled to a point in front—began to compete with the draped chaperon, especially in Italy. A brimless scarlet cap became nearly universal for young Florentines in particular, and was widely worn by older men and those in other cities.1

I gather pictures of head-gear. I find them in illuminated manuscripts, sketches and in paintings. Some of the pictures are quite small and a bit blurred, but I thought it was important to have pictures from different sources rather than just the famous high quality ones. I gather pictures of head gear. I find them in illuminated manuscripts, sketches and in paintings. Some of the pictures are quite small and a bit blurred, but I thought it was important to have pictures from different sources rather than just the famous high quality ones.

Men throughout the 1400’s still wore bycokets, the colors tend to be darker colors.

In the early 1400’s hoods were still common in all parts of society, often worn around the neck as a cowl or either alone or with other headgear.

Hats of imaginary styles were popular. Tall-crowned with small brims or no brims at all, hats with brims turned up on one side for variations of the coif, or bycotes with low-crowned with wider brims pulled to a point in front. A brimless scarlet cap became nearly universal for young Florentines in particular, and was widely worn by older men and those in other cities.

By the late 1470’s men in Northern Europe wore their hair longer with shorter caps.

The tall brimless hat

Tall brimless hats, often black or red was popular though out the century.

Chaperon with liripipe

A (liripipe) hood, originally covering the head and shoulders with a hole was cut in the fabric to frame the face. The point of the hood was often very long – called a liripipe.

In the 1400’s changing masculine fashion dictated that the head should go right through the visor and the neckpiece be raised to form a crest on the head, often on a padded ring (bourrelet). The point of the hood was then worn round the neck or round the head. Worn in this manner it was called a chaperon. Inside church or in the present of high ranking nobility men would wear them over their shoulder. I kind of think of it as a baseball cap worn backwards for fashion purposes.

Hairstyles

By mid century a bowl haircut with the neck shaved became popular.  In Germany a a fussy of blond hair was breifly popular in romantic pictures. By the end of the century should length hair had come into style and continued into the early 1500’s.2

Male commoners’ head gear


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