Male hair styles and head gear in the 1300’s

The diversity of styles and colors of headgear increased greatly in the 1300’s. Although there are still uncovered heads shown in the manuscripts, it really does complete the outfit more when appropriate headgear is worn.

I gather pictures of head gear. I find them in illuminated manuscripts, sketches and in paintings. Some of the pictures are quite small and a bit blurred, but I thought it was important to have pictures from different sources rather than just the famous high quality ones. I gather pictures of head gear. I find them in illuminated manuscripts, sketches and in paintings. Some of the pictures are quite small and a bit blurred, but I thought it was important to have pictures from different sources rather than just the famous high quality ones.

Coifs, brimmed hats, soft hats with the brim turned up and the tall black hats turns up towards the end of the century.

Liripipe and chaperon

The chaperon transformed from a utilitarian hood (liripipe) with a small cape to becoming a complicated and fashionable hat worn by the wealthy in town settings. This came when they began to be worn with the opening for the face placed instead on the top of the head.

Bycocket

From the images I gather that bycockets (or chapeau à bec) became quite popular in the 1300’s and 1400’s. The bycocket, is what we would think of as a Robin Hood hat – it has a wide brim that is turned up in the back and pointed in the front like a bird’s beak. They were worn by men and woman and was in use between the 1200’s and the 1500’s. They started as a hat worn by nobility but the growing merchant class took to it.

Hairstyles

In the 1300’s I find a lot of pictures of both men and women with uncovered hair. More woman than men, as many of the married woman wore some sort of head covering. But it seem that the men of the 1300’s were quite happy to go bare headed. Most wear their hair brushed back from the face and either chin or ear length hair. Many are either clean shaven or have a chin curtain of a beard.

Male commoners


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