Cuisine: Campfire cooking
apple fritters and a dish of fresh fruit

Apple fritters

In the renaissance in Denmark fritters of different kinds were all the rage. One of the ones that have transformed and is still a traditional dish in Denmark is the apple fritter “æbleskiver” – not that there is apples in the modern ones. This is a much more traditional apple fritter – with apples inside. I got the recipe from a friend, so I am not quite sure where she has it from, but the method and ingredients are all appropriate for the period.

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Apple fritters
Wonderful apple fritters as they could have been made in the renaissance
apple fritters and a dish of fresh fruit
Servings
Ingredients
Servings
Ingredients
apple fritters and a dish of fresh fruit
Instructions
  1. Cut the apples into thin slices and let it sit in the sugar and juice mix for at least two hours. This will sweeten and flavour the apples.
  2. Whip the whites stiff enough that you can turn the bowl over.
  3. Mix the other ingrediens in another bowl and fold in the whites. The dough is quite thick - that is on purpose.
  4. Dry the apples (save the liquid and make it into a dipping sauce) and cover the apple with the batter.
  5. Fry them on both sides in a hot pan with the butter. You might need to add a bit of batter if the apples are not quite covered.
Recipe Notes

This is the precursor to the danish dish "æbleskiver"

Sadly I do not have the historical source as the recipe comes from a danish television show

Spring onion and fennel

Vegetable soup

A tasty and filling spring vegetable soup, inspired by medieval cooking techniques and produce. The soup pairs well with sausages and bread.

If you have any spring herbs handy, I am sure they would work great, but we were too tired to do any foraging this evening.

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Vegetable soup
A tasty and filling spring soup, inspired by medieval cooking techniques and produce. Perfect campfire food.
Spring onion and fennel
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Spring onion and fennel
Instructions
  1. Make sure to have a fire going with some embers.
  2. Cut the vegetables into chunks, dices and slices
  3. Fry them off quickly to soften the onion in the bottom of the cooking pot
  4. Pour in water (the amount you want for the soup)
  5. Let it simmer for a bit
  6. Add the barley
  7. Let it all simmer until the barley is tender (this should take about 20 minutes)
  8. Season it with what-ever you got handy, but it will need a bit of salt. Herbs would be great.
  9. Serve the soup with bread

Oatmeal klatkager

Pancakes made from oatmeal or similar porridge. A leftover dish that is perfect for breakfast or as a snack in the afternoon.

Serve them with cheese, fruit or jam. Keep Reading

Fresh cottage cheese from buttermilk

A soft fresh cheese made from buttermilk, seasoned with herbs. In Danish it is called “knapost” and is a traditional cottage cheese. Quite possible the easiest home made cheese you can make. Requires no special equipment.

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Cock-a-leek

My version of the traditional Scottish soup recipe. Mine is more of a stew than a soup – thickened with barley.

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Barley crackers

Crackers baked on a dry skillet or a hot stone next to the campfire. You can also bake them on a pizza stone but they might raise a little in the hot oven.

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Barley crackers
Viking inspired quick barley crackers baked on a dry skillet or a hot stone next to the campfire.
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Mix all the ingredients and knead it.
  2. Roll out the dough into a big sheet of dough.
  3. Cut out the crackers and prick them with a fork.
  4. Bake them on a hot dry frying pan - flip them a few times so they don't burn. They need about 5 minutes on each side. They are light brown when they are done. If they get a bit burned it is ok, it still taste wonderful.
Recipe Notes

Source: Mit vilde vikingekøkken af Jim Lyngvild

Damper

A damper is an Austrian bread type that as far as I know has its origin in the colony area. It is a very quick bread. You just throw the ingredients together and then bake it right away. It can very easily be baked in a frying pan over a campfire.

Keep Reading