Course: Side dish
The finished quince butter in a glass bowl

Quince Butter

Soft, delicious and piquant – jam-like spread that works well for bread or to pair with cheese. It is quite a lot of work to make, but it is so fantastic that I am planing to do it again this year. It does take quite a bit of work, but it is worth it!

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Quince Butter
Soft, delicious and piquant - jam-like spread that works well for bread or to pair with cheese. It is quite a lot of work to make, but it is so fantastic that I am planing to do it again this year. It does take quite a bit of work, but it is worth it!
Prep Time 1 hour
Cook Time 1,5 hours
Servings
liters
Ingredients
Prep Time 1 hour
Cook Time 1,5 hours
Servings
liters
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Wash apples and quince thoroughly
  2. Cut them in quarters. Do not remove the cored and peal.
  3. Boil water, quince and apples together under the lid until they are tender. It takes 30-60 min
  4. Moss them through a sieve with a spatula. It takes quite a while, but is not difficult.
  5. Pour the mash back into the pot and add the rest of the ingredients. Let it simmer for 20-30 min. Make sure not to let it burn
  6. Season with ginger, lemon and sugar.
  7. Pour the hot quince butter on clean glass.
Recipe Notes

Yields about 2 liters of finished preserve

Source: syltedronningen.dk

Mawmenee

Maumenee

This is one of the stranger dishes I have run into. It is a sweet wine stew with foul meat and nuts. It is very much a medieval dish with all the spices and colouring and artificiality that was so priced. It is also a really tasty dish, but also very sweet dish.  It works really well as a side dish for game – like we in modern time use a jam or cranberry sauce with game. The dish can be made with any kind of foul – the meat should be a game-meat as that adds to the flavour.

Keep Reading

Spiced “Hungarian” Spinach

Kogt Spinat på Ungarsk

This dish is a renaissance spinach dish, that is spiced and cooked in a pot or a pan. The recipe is from 1597 and is from one of the oldest cookbooks printed in Danish, though the book is originally German. It is a simple dish that is meant to be served with fish. It is quite a tasty way to eat spinach. It is said to be “Hungarian”, not because the recipe is from Hungary but because of the spices used. Many of the recipes in the cookbook is said to me in Hungarian, which just means spiced with onion. Keep Reading

Pearl Barley Salad

One of my favourite salads is one based on boiled pearl barley. I love it because it is filling, fresh and easy to make. I often serve it instead of pasta or potatoes and people generally seem pretty happy with that. More often than not we have fish or a steak on the side but sometimes I serve it with some fried goats cheese on top instead of meat on the side. I do quite a few variations on this salad, but the boiled barley is at the core of each variation.

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Maumenee

Maumenee is a kind of sweet wine stew with game meat, dates and nuts. It is a lot tastier than that sound. It works really well as a sauce for other game dishes.

I think it can be made with any game meat. We used rook, the original recipe calls for chicken or hare.

The original recipe from 1390 from Forme of Cury1

Mawmenee. Take a potell of wyne greke and ii poude of sugur; take and clarfye the sugur with a quantite of wyne & drawe it thurgh a strynour in to a pot of erhe. Take pynes with date and frye hem a litell in grece oþer in oyle and cast hem togydre. Take clowes & flour of canel hool and cast þerto. Take powdour gynger, canel, clowes, colour it with saundres a lytel yf hit be nede. Cast salt þerto, and lat it seeþ warly with a slowe fyre and not to thyk. Take brawn of capouns ysteysed oþer of feauntes teysed small and cast þerto.

I will recommend using less sugar than the recipe calls for. I will post an updated recipe once I have tested it. We used powdour fort in addition to the spices listed – because we like it. But this is the recipe as it is in Middelaldermad, I added our variations in parentheses. I would also recommend making a half portion unless you are cooking for a lot of people as the portion is really big.

You can find other versions of the recipe @medievalcookery.com

 

Print Recipe
Maumenee
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
  • 1 bottle white wine preferably sweet German white wine, but any white wine will do
  • 400 grams sugar use less than this - the wine mixture should be sweet but not overly so.
  • 100 milliliters rice flour
  • 200 milliliters pine nuts we used chopped almonds which worked fine
  • 200 milliliters dates quartered (without stones). Fresh or dry
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil for frying
  • 400 grams rooster or pheasant or rook. Diced
The spices
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
  • 1 bottle white wine preferably sweet German white wine, but any white wine will do
  • 400 grams sugar use less than this - the wine mixture should be sweet but not overly so.
  • 100 milliliters rice flour
  • 200 milliliters pine nuts we used chopped almonds which worked fine
  • 200 milliliters dates quartered (without stones). Fresh or dry
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil for frying
  • 400 grams rooster or pheasant or rook. Diced
The spices
Instructions
  1. Wine and sugar is heated though until the sugar is dissolved. Dissolve the rice flour in a bit of water (I used about half a cup) to prevent lumps and thicken the wine with the rice flour.
  2. Fry the dates and nuts in the olive oil and add it to the pot.
  3. Tie the whole spices into a piece of cloth or a tea bag and put them into the pot. Add the other spices. Color the stew with the sandalwood or the food coloring. You want it to stop being greyish.
  4. Let it simmer for a bit. Take up the spice bag (it is easier that way) and add in the raw meat.
  5. Let the stew simmer for 15 minutes until it reaches a sauce consistency.
  6. Add salt to taste. Serve warm
Recipe Notes

Source: The original recipe from 1390 from Forme of Cury. Form of Cure, originally from Curye in Inglysch, edited by C. B. Hieatt and S. Butler, London 1985). From Middelaldermad by Bi Skaarup & Henrik Jacobsen. There are many other transcriptions of this recipe, but this is the one I used.

You can find other versions of the recipe @medievalcookery.com

Market Scene, Pieter Aertsen,1569

Carrots in lemon and theme

This is a super simple recipe for lemon steamed carrots, that we cooked for the medieval inspired larp event this winter.

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Carrots in lemon and theme
A simple side dish
Market Scene, Pieter Aertsen,1569
Course Side dish
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Course Side dish
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Market Scene, Pieter Aertsen,1569
Instructions
  1. Clean the carrots and cut them into similar sized pieces.
  2. Peal the lemon and juice it.
  3. Place the carrots in a pot and pour the juice over it. If it seem like it is a bit too dry add a bit of water. You only need a little bit of liquid to cook the carrots.
  4. Add the lemon peal to the pot.
  5. Cook the carrots under a lid. Remember to test them so they don\'t got too soft. You want them with a bit of bite.
  6. Drain the carrots and place them in a nice dish and sprinkle the theme over.
Recipe Notes

Source: Smag på maden

Green Peas to serve with meat

This is a side dish of spiced green peas that goes well with meat. The recipe is from the 1400’s.

Grene Pesen. Take yonge grene pesen, and sethe hom with gode broth of beef, and take parsel, sage, saveray, and ysope, and a lytle brede, and bray all this in a morter, and sume of the pesen therpyth, and tempur hit wuth the broth, and do hit in a pot to the other pesen, and let hit boyle togedur, and serve hit forth.

From Pleyn Delit, no 20

I used fewer spices than the original recipe calls for, just because it is in the middle of the winter and I wasn’t able to get hold of hyssop or savory or mint at this time of year. Instead I used thyme – I am sure the real version is more complex, but my version did taste good.

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Green Peas to serve with meat
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Defrost the peas, if you are using frozen ones, like I did.
  2. Cook the peas in a bit of stock.
  3. Bend the bread to make breadcrumbs - remember to remove the crust.
  4. Take 100 ml of peas and blend them with the stock and herbs.
  5. Heat the pea source and let it thicken a bit.
  6. Mix it with with the cooked peas and heat them if needed.
Recipe Notes

Source: Pleyn Delit 1400's

Kale salad with pomegranate

Kale salad with pomegranate

A medieval inspired kale salad with pomegranate, which is quick and easy to make. The combination of the lightly bitter kale and the fresh and sweet pomegranate is rather neat. Keep Reading

Kale & Orange salad

A quick and easy kale salad with orange and apple.

Consider adding some nuts if you have any. Just roughly chopped over the top. Keep Reading

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