Male hair styles and head gear in the 1400’s

Early in the 1400’s, the (liripipe) hood remained a common component of dress for all classes, although it was frequently worn around the neck as a cowl or twisted into the fantastical shapes of the chaperon. Hats of various styles—tall-crowned with small brims or no brims at all, hats with brims turned up on one side for variations of the coif, or low-crowned with wider brims pulled to a point in front—began to compete with the draped chaperon, especially in Italy. A brimless scarlet cap became nearly universal for young Florentines in particular, and was widely worn by older men and those in other cities.1

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Female headgear in the middle ages

Nobel headgear became quite elaborate during the period – we have all see the “princess hats” which were actually worn for a period of time. Some are very high, other very wide and some gives really different head shapes. Married women would generally always wear something on their heads when out in public. Women are almost always shown to have their hair styled in some way even in pictures of them dressing or bathing. Both men and women would wear hoods with long tails called a liripipe (studshætte).

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Fabric in the middel ages

Everyday clothing was homemade both fabric and the sewing. While the fabric for finer clothing was brought.

Everyday clothing was made from home-spun: linen, woolskins and leather.

Finer clothing were made by brought and if you could afford it imported wool from the Nederlands. Silke, gold brocade og cotton from southern Europe, the Middle East and Asia. The imported fabric rolls might be sealed with lead seals to garanti quality. If you could afford it would would want to be seen wearing fur.

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