Ingredient: butter
apple fritters and a dish of fresh fruit

Apple fritters

In the renaissance in Denmark fritters of different kinds were all the rage. One of the ones that have transformed and is still a traditional dish in Denmark is the apple fritter “æbleskiver” – not that there is apples in the modern ones. This is a much more traditional apple fritter – with apples inside. I got the recipe from a friend, so I am not quite sure where she has it from, but the method and ingredients are all appropriate for the period.

Print Recipe
Apple fritters
Wonderful apple fritters as they could have been made in the renaissance
apple fritters and a dish of fresh fruit
Servings
Ingredients
Servings
Ingredients
apple fritters and a dish of fresh fruit
Instructions
  1. Cut the apples into thin slices and let it sit in the sugar and juice mix for at least two hours. This will sweeten and flavour the apples.
  2. Whip the whites stiff enough that you can turn the bowl over.
  3. Mix the other ingrediens in another bowl and fold in the whites. The dough is quite thick - that is on purpose.
  4. Dry the apples (save the liquid and make it into a dipping sauce) and cover the apple with the batter.
  5. Fry them on both sides in a hot pan with the butter. You might need to add a bit of batter if the apples are not quite covered.
Recipe Notes

This is the precursor to the danish dish "æbleskiver"

Sadly I do not have the historical source as the recipe comes from a danish television show

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