Browse Author

Sidsel

My name is Sidsel Pedersen and I am from Denmark. I am a highschool teacher and an avid reader of science fiction, fantasy and other speculative fiction. I am also a roleplayer and a happy home cook.

Three Clover Cakes

I found this recipe in one of my mom’s 1980’s recipe books and I had to try it out! It turned out to be a rather tasty small cake or large cookie – I am not sure which is the better word. It was found in a Christmas cookbook but I do not know it as a Christmas cookie, so I think you could bake it at any time of the year. I am baking them for the a larp event.

Keep Reading

Jewish Christmas Cookies

Jødekager

These cookies were developed by Jewish bakers in Copenhagen in the 1800’s at some point. They are part of the Danish Christmas cookie pantheon. If you ask most of my family they are the best part.

They became popular among the other new cookies when the wood stove was introduced in the second half og the 1800’s and it became possible to make cookies, in your own kitchen no less.

Keep Reading

Female garb between 1000 and 1300

The early medieval period does not have as much variation in the female dress as the later periods, but it does have some beautiful garments. It is interesting to see the female dress go from simple cotes and mantles over the elaborerte wide sleeved bliaut in the 1100’s and back to simpler cotes and cyclas in the 1200’s.

My personal favourite is the 1200’s fashion. If I didn’t have any restriction on which period to create a dress for that is the style I would go for. It just seem so comfortable and lovely.

Keep Reading

Male hair styles and head gear in the 1400’s

Early in the 1400’s, the (liripipe) hood remained a common component of dress for all classes, although it was frequently worn around the neck as a cowl or twisted into the fantastical shapes of the chaperon. Hats of various styles—tall-crowned with small brims or no brims at all, hats with brims turned up on one side for variations of the coif, or low-crowned with wider brims pulled to a point in front—began to compete with the draped chaperon, especially in Italy. A brimless scarlet cap became nearly universal for young Florentines in particular, and was widely worn by older men and those in other cities.1

Keep Reading